Medical / Research Team

Jun Li, M.D., Ph.d., Neurology

Jun Li, M.D., Ph.d., Neurology

Dr. Jun Li

Dr. Li is a tenured Professor of Neurology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He is sub-specialized in Neuromuscular Diseases with a special interest in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases and myelin biology, including pathogenesis and therapeutic development of CMT4J. He directs the Vanderbilt CMT Clinic, which has been recognized by the CMT Association as ​a​​​ CMT Center of Excellence. This clinic is a part of Inherited Neuropathy Consortium.

Dr. Li has been a member ​of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the study sections of the National Institutes of Health. He has been a reviewer for a variety of journals in the field of peripheral nerve and myelin biology. He has been invited to give numerous talks at universities and domestic/international meetings.

Dr. Li is a past recipient of NIH K08 award. Since 2005, he has been elected as the Best Doctors in America. In 2014, he received the Wolfe Research Prize from American Neurological Association. Dr. Li’s laboratory has been funded by NIH, Department of Veteran’s Affairs, and Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Dr. Steven J. Gray

Dr. Steven J. Gray

Dr. Steven J. Gray

Dr. Steven J. Gray is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Ophthalmology, U. of N. Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is also an investigator in the UNC Gene Therapy Center and Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities. He was previously a Post Doc at UNC and before that had undertaken a PhD in Molecular Biology, at Vanderbilt University. His core expertise is in AAV gene therapy vector engineering, followed by optimizing approaches to deliver a gene to the nervous system or eye.

His major focus is in AAV vector development to develop vector tailored to serve specific clinical and research applications involving the nervous system. These include the development of novel AAV capsids amenable to widespread CNS gene transfer or specialized ocular gene transfer. As AAV-based platform gene transfer technologies have been developed to achieve global, efficient, and in some cases cell-type specific CNS gene delivery, his research focus has also included preclinical studies to apply these reagents toward the development of treatments for neurological diseases.

Currently these include preclinical studies for Rett Syndrome, Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN), Tay-Sachs, Krabbe, AGU, and Batten Disease, and have expanded into human clinical studies to test a gene therapy approach for GAN.

He has published over 50 peer reviewed papers and has 3 pending patents. His research is funded by NIH and other research foundations.

Dr. Cathleen Lutz

Dr. Cathleen Lutz

Dr. Cathleen Lutz

Dr. Lutz is the Director of the Rare and Orphan Disease Center at The Jackson Laboratory. She holds a PhD in Biochemistry with a Master’s degree in Business Administration. She oversees both the Mouse Repository and the In Vivo Pharmacology program at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine.

Dr. Lutz and her team work collaboratively with numerous disease foundations to ensure the preclinical mouse models are well characterized and available to the scientific community. In addition to genetically engineering new models for preclinical discovery, Dr. Lutz and her team perform in vivo pharmacology and efficacy experiments for new potential therapeutics.

Dr. Lutz is the Co-Principal Investigator to the new NIH grant at The Jackson Laboratory, Resource for Research of Peripheral Neuropathy, which serves to accelerate the creation, distribution and use of high-priority mouse models for CMT research. She is joined in this effort with her colleagues Professor Robert Burgess, PhD and Research Scientist Kevin Seburn, Ph.D.

More details on the team to be posted soon.